James Geurts ~ Liminal Trajectories ~

Exhibition dates: 16th of August – 7th September, 2019


C A V E S  is pleased to present a solo exhibition by James Geurts
Liminal Trajectories moves from the astrophysical to the primordial, to the technological.
The exhibition crosses between field works and laboratory works, from the site of the Murchison Meteorite in North Victoria, to the site of CSIRO, Clayton. As part of the ANAT Synapse artist-in-residency, extensive research was undertaken working with the prebiotic material and investigating the phenomena of the meteorite intersecting earth in September 1969. Identified as one of the most primitive and profound astronomical bodies, the Murchison Meteorite comprises complex organic compounds, which ultimately forged the building blocks of life.

James Geurts draws out geographic and conceptual forms that are layered within specific sites of his research. The artist examines how natural and cultural forces shape perception. James works across the disciplines of drawing, sculpture, photography, video, and Public Art/Land Art. Exhibitions include: National Gallery of Victoria; White Cube, London; Gemak, The Hague, Netherlands; Centre for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv Israel; Art Gallery of South Australia; Kuandu Museum of Fine Art, Taipei; La Chambre Blanche, Quebec; and the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, and has recently been awarded the Australia Council for the Arts ACME London Studio residency, April - September 2020.  
 
Melbourne based James Geurts studied Master of Fine Arts at RMIT University and undertook Post Graduate research at Vrije Academie, The Hague, Netherlands. 
Represented by GAGPROJECTS (Greenaway Art Gallery) Adelaide, Berlin and Contemporary Art Society, London
jamesgeurts.com

Text by Sophie Knezic accompanying the exhibition. Supported through the ANAT Synapse program and CSIRO Advanced Manufacturing, with the assistance of Creative Victoria. In collaboration with CSIROscientists Dr Richard Evans and Dr Helmut Thissen, expanding on the Miller-Urey experiment 1952.